Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Hanover one-way havoc

Photo+by+Angela+Bray
Photo by Angela Bray

Angela Christoforos

Journal Contributor

The North End’s Hanover Street is known for static vehicle traffic and consistent bustling among sidewalks and cafes. But a new proposal might change this permanently: a surfacing proposition to turn the central main street into a one-way, as well as revamping with gasoline gaslight lampposts and trees.

A recent story in the Boston Globe stated Boston Transportation Department officials would be responsible for any changes made. With enough community support, they are open to consideration, although they have not yet seen the plans.

Chairman of the North End Chamber of Commerce, Frank De Pasquale, supports this change, saying he believes it would improve the area. However, it is controversial among some North End residents who believe the chaotic aura of Hanover Street adds character to the Italian neighborhood and revamping it would eliminate the historical charm and tradition of Boston’s “Little Italy.”

On the contrary, some believe that changing Hanover to a one-way will help ease the traffic chaos and make the street more orderly in general.

“Growing up in the North End, Hanover Street has always been like a landmark,” said Suffolk senior and current North End Resident Tayla Gobbi. “If it were changed, it would take away the tradition of all of the chaos and loud Italians on each side of the street. North Enders don’t like change when it comes to their neighborhood.”

Other rising concerns argue that turning the tumultuous street into a one-way will increase the number of people on the street during late night hours; the neighborhood is already notorious for noise complaints and commotion.

According to the Boston Globe, David Kubiak, head of the zoning committee for the residents’ association, worries about more evening traffic contributing vandalism and more noise disruption.

“I definitely believe this would increase noise complaints in this neighborhood,” said Robert Dello Russo, business owner of Boston Barber Co. on Salem Street. “Realistically, this idea sounds crazy.”

“I think the idea is ridiculous because every street in the North End leads into Hanover Street,” he said. “Where are all of the cars supposed to go? It’s like a river; if you cut off all the streams then where is the water going to go? The North End will be a mess if Hanover becomes a one-way, this place will be like a maze. There are already enough-one way streets in the North End.”

“The fact that Hanover street is a two-way makes it very convenient, less chaotic, and different from all of the other streets in the North End,” said Suffolk senior and North End Resident Jenna Matus. “It wouldn’t bother me if it were turned into a one-way street, but I think that it would cause a lot more traffic, especially on the weekends and in the summertime.”

The future status of Hanover Street lies in the hands of the Boston Transportation Department; which would handle the responsibility of making over the street if the proposal becomes a definite plan. Depending on community support and approval from the neighborhoods’ main groups (The North End Waterfront Neighborhood Council, the North End Waterfront Residents Association and the North End Chamber of Commerce) before the summer, Hanover Street could officially be turning onto a new leaf.

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Hanover one-way havoc