The Suffolk Journal

“Hamilton” brings the American Revolution home to Boston

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Nearly 250 years after the Boston Massacre sparked rebellion in the 13 British colonies that founded America, the American Revolution has come full circle as the Grammy and Tony award winning musical “Hamilton” made its way to the famed Boston Opera House.

Pulitzer Prize winner Lin-Manuel Miranda wrote both the lyrics and script of the show after being inspired by Ron Chernow’s book “Alexander Hamilton,” a biography detailing the life and death of the founding father.

The Boston run of the musical’s second national tour began on Sept. 18 and will last until Nov. 18, but fans of the show are hard pressed to find tickets, with the majority of the shows having limited seating. Tickets are selling for upwards of $180 for balcony seats, according to Ticketmaster’s website.

With a mix of old-school rap references, genius comedic timing and the ability to teach American history without it seeming like you’re sitting at a desk in high school, it’s no wonder the show can connect with audiences of all ages. ”

“We never say a show is sold out,” said usher Aurelia Lyman in an interview with The Suffolk Journal. “There’s always a bit of something, but it’s been very well sold with very few seats remaining every night.”

In an interview with The Washington Post, set designer David Korins explained how since the show is fast-paced, there’s no time for set changes between songs. Instead, a stage full of deconstructed scaffolding represents the base the founding fathers had built for America.

The show revolves, quite literally, on two concentric circles, which allows the performers to move without stepping and place props without needing a stage crew. Korins also said that the circles represent the circular relationship Aaron Burr and Hamilton have, which is a driving force of the show.

There is a glimpse of hope for those who cannot afford the expensive tickets. The Hamilton Lottery, a tradition continuing from the original New York production, allows fans to enter a raffle for a chance to win discounted tickets for the show the following night. For those looking for tickets, this may be the best option. The lottery can be found at luckyseat.com/hamilton-boston.

According to Billboard, when released in Sept. of 2016, the “Hamilton” cast soundtrack was the highest charting cast album since 1963. The album debuted at No. 13 on the Billboard 200 list. The high demand for tickets is expected to persist throughout the entire run of the show in Boston, according to Lyman.

With a mix of old-school rap references, genius comedic timing and the ability to teach American history without it seeming like you’re sitting at a desk in high school, it’s no wonder the show can connect with audiences of all ages. Families, college kids, and grandparents alike have flocked to the Boston Opera House since opening night. The show will to continue to draw a crowd from near and far.

To be able to see firsthand the anguish on Angelica’s face during “Satisfied,” the desperation of the Patriots to gain independence from Britain in “The Battle of Yorktown” and how quirky King George’s gestures are during “You’ll Be Back” adds an entirely new interpretation to the songs that is not represented from listening to the soundtrack alone.

Marie Hamel, 17, and Maggie Hamel, 14, sisters from York, Maine, made the drive down to Boston on a school night to see the show, and had nothing but shining remarks regarding the musical.

“I think everything is so much more clear, you know what’s going on,” said Maggie Hamel in an interview with The Journal. “When you can actually see it, everything makes more sense and it’s so amazing.”

Boston, do not throw away your shot.

For three days, Oct. 23 through Oct. 26, students can enter into their own Hamilton Lottery. The Performing Arts Office (PAO) will be auctioning off the opportunity to purchase tickets to the Nov. 4 showing for only $25. On Nov. 1, fifty students will be chosen to receive the opportunity to buy these tickets. Information can be found on the PAO office’s Facebook page.

The production will head to Buffalo, NY next, continuing to spread the story of Alexander Hamilton’s life through music and dance across the country.

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“Hamilton” brings the American Revolution home to Boston