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The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Amy Poehler’s ‘Moxie’ is paving the way for future representation in media

Moxie was released on Netflix on March 3.
Netflix Media Center
“Moxie” was released on Netflix on March 3.

The Netflix original “Moxie” features a diverse cast and inspires hope for more diversity in media while raising viewers expectations of representation. 

“Moxie,” released on March 3, is based on the book by Jennifer Mathieu under the same name. The movie is directed and produced by Amy Poehler.

When new girl Lucy comes to Rockport High School, she inspires a revolutionary movement. Sixteen-year-old Vivian, raised by her rebellious single mother, comes to realize the sexual harassment that surrounds her school and, taking a page from her mother’s book, starts an anonymous zine, a homemade magazine. As the zine gains popularity, Vivian and Lucy form the group Moxie, a feminist club determined to stop the harassment they face each day and give a voice to their fellow peers.

As the club forms and the girls band together to fight for what they believe in, they show the power and strength there is in numbers. It took just one thought to start the revolution, but it was their community and support for each other that encouraged others to stand up and use their voice.

The “Moxie” zine is published anonymously, a response to Vivian’s introverted tendencies, and promotes the concept of activism from a quieter viewpoint. Vivian shows that there are ways to make a difference that can fit a person’s style, and that not every form of activism has to be loud. 

Both introverts and extroverts have a place in standing up for what’s right, and as “Moxie” shows, they do not need to change themselves to do so. 

The film calls attention to the flaws in the administration of public school systems and the lack of attention there is to preventing bullying and harassment between students. 

The principal at Rockport High commonly turns a blind eye to sexual harassment reports and students’ popularity that stems from them bullying. The teachers often play a role in the harassment themselves when they don’t stand up for their students. 

“Moxie” features a diverse cast and delves into many social issues that go hand in hand with sexism. With cast members of many different ethnicities, LGBTQ representation, and various body types, along with the representation of disabled characters, single-parent households and rape survivors, the movie is an example of the diversity that should be commonly displayed on screen.

Vivian’s best friend is also a first-generation American from an immigrant family, showcasing the expectations that come with being a first generation student. 

The cultural differences between Vivian and her friends’ households also bring to light the importance of empathy for everyone’s situation. 

Along with this representation, the film does an amazing job depicting the stigma that each group faces. The main focus of “Moxie” is women’s rights, but the film mentions the rights and freedoms of every person and group. 

The film also discusses the separation between male and female athletes, and the notoriety male athletes get. Sexism is deeply rooted in many aspects of life, and “Moxie” depicts just how far the problem goes. 

The subtle details of the film will enlighten younger audiences to see the diversity between everyone, from their personalities, backgrounds, fashion and outward appearance. While most media from our childhood featured straight, neurotypical and white characters, “Moxie” brings hope that future generations will grow up seeing real life depicted on the screen.

Follow Alida on Twitter @AlidaBenoit

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About the Contributor
Alida Benoit
Alida Benoit, Asst. Arts & Culture Editor | she/her
Alida is a sophomore Graphic Design major from Brunswick, Maine. Her passions include reading, writing, listening to music, and playing with her dog, Sirius Black. After graduation, she hopes to work for a publishing company and travel the world. Follow Alida on Twitter @AlidaBenoit  
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Amy Poehler’s ‘Moxie’ is paving the way for future representation in media