The Suffolk Journal

MFA Exhibit Allows Spectators To Relive Childhood Classic ‘Winnie-the-Pooh’

Author+A.A.+Milne+posing+with+his+son+Christopher+Robin+Milne+as+Christopher+holds+his+teddy+bear+in+1926.
Author A.A. Milne posing with his son Christopher Robin Milne as Christopher holds his teddy bear in 1926.

Author A.A. Milne posing with his son Christopher Robin Milne as Christopher holds his teddy bear in 1926.

Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Author A.A. Milne posing with his son Christopher Robin Milne as Christopher holds his teddy bear in 1926.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic,” the newest installation at the Museum of Fine Arts, transports visitors into the world of the famous children’s book.

Spectators can feel “Winnie-the-Pooh” books come to life on the walls of the exhibit, instilling a feeling of being at home as a child waiting for story time.

And that is what the exhibit does: it tells the story of the creation of Winnie-the-Pooh and shows how the loveable bear got to his existing status.

Original drawings, letters and pictures of all sizes line the walls. Starting at the very beginning, visitors get to see the creation of the  beloved Winnie-The-Pooh stories from start to finish. Spectators get to witness how the characters of “Winnie-The-Pooh” were formed and edited over time.

The exhibit draws an audience due to the first-hand experience of getting to see author A.A. Milne’s creative process. The drawings are raw with the pencil marks brushing over every inch of the beloved bear.

There are also interactive aspects throughout the installation that visitors can enjoy, which include a miniature bed designed for small children to sit on while being read a story and a white drawing table with chairs.

The interactive qualities of the exhibit separate “Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic” from other exhibits at the MFA, as well as making it more child-friendly. However, the exhibit attracts adults too, since Winnie-the-Pooh has been around for generations.

The exhibit appeals to children, but also to the inner child in all of us.

The exhibit allows spectators of all ages to view the books and their messages from a new lens, shedding light on the various messages found within the book.

The characters embody different human qualities, and together they exemplify friendship. This can be seen through quotes on the walls and in the book itself.

A large room towards the end of the exhibit has walls with drawings of Winnie-the-Pooh’s life as wallpaper. At the beginning marks a doorway into Winnie-the-Pooh’s home with the Mr. Sanders sign at the top, the famous sign that was above Pooh’s door.

Near Pooh’s home, a white bridge rests with a projected waterway underneath, where visitors can take a picture, walk across or admire the drawings of scenery from the books behind it.

The sketches were an essential component of the exhibit and makes the viewers feel like a part of the story rather than a spectator. The visitor is incorporated into the storyline and watches it progress as time passes.

At the end of the exhibit, a quote written by Milne is displayed, which says “But, of course, it isn’t really Goodbye because the Forest will always be there… and anybody who is Friendly with Bears can find it.” The quote encompasses the experience of the exhibit and everything Winnie-the-Pooh stands for.

The exhibit fills up quickly, so all tickets are on reserve for designated time slots. “Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic” is on view in the MFA’s Torf Gallery until Jan. 6.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.
MFA Exhibit Allows Spectators To Relive Childhood Classic ‘Winnie-the-Pooh’