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The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

‘The Play That Goes Wrong’ does everything right

Students+perform+The+Play+That+Goes+Wrong+for+Performing+Arts.
Courtesy of Dan McHugh
Students perform The Play That Goes Wrong for Performing Arts.

Crowds were teeming with laughter this past weekend as Suffolk University’s Performing Arts Office put on their performance of “The Play That Goes Wrong” at the Modern Theatre.

From Feb. 23-25, students, families and friends were invited to a night filled with both mystery and mishaps. The humorous production provided audiences with a “whodunit” thriller, followed by forgotten lines and a crumbling set before the killer could be caught. 

“The Play That Goes Wrong” is a play within a play that did not fail to deliver a wide variety of antics that left the audience dissolving in laughter. As viewers got an inside look into the opening night of “The Murder at Haversham Manor,” collapsing platforms, misplaced props, unconscious actors and moments for dramatic pauses provided an element of surprise each time the actors stepped on stage. 

“I’m most excited for our audiences just to see all the gags in the show,” said Jenna White, a freshman at Suffolk University who played the role of Sandra. “Each night the show differs, so each audience gets something new which adds such a cool element to it in my opinion.”

The production included a wide array of cast and crew who each helped to add a variety of moving components to the big show in order to uncover who was guilty in the murder of Charles Haversham. From an operative detective and a forgetful butler to a human fireplace, audience members sat on the edges of their seats skeptical of what could go wrong next.

With no intermission, the play had a total run time of 75 minutes that cleared the way for endless hilarity. 

“It’s absolutely hilarious and takes on comedy in a way completely different from most shows,” said White.

As the show made its debut on the Modern Theatre stage, audiences and actors felt as though this new production added both an active and animated spin to the Suffolk stage. 

“The super elaborate set and the amount of living parts and stunts is definitely really different,” said Ian McKissick, a Suffolk University freshman who played the role of Dennis. He also added that this production worked to incorporate a variety of hidden details that are a prize for the eyes of viewers. 

“…The show has a lot of small bits that the audience can only really see if they pay super close attention, essentially rewarding the audience for looking at every detail,” he said.

The PAO has been known for putting on an array of interactive and humorous shows, including last semester’s “Murder at Prom ’93” dinner theater production, which was a fan favorite. McKissick was also cast in this production, and says that his time with the PAO has helped with his love of performing. 

“It may sound basic but just getting to perform is really wonderful if I’m honest,” he said. “Performance is something very integral to me that I always want to keep in my life and doing shows with the PAO is really important for that.”

Overall the PAO’S production of “The Play That Goes Wrong” provided a number of gags and tricks that left audiences in amusement. With the help of a tremendous cast and crew, each and every viewer left with a grin across their face. 

Follow Julia on Twitter @julianap_03

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About the Contributor
Juliana Pinto, Staff Writer | she/her
Juliana is a sophomore from Lynn, Massachusetts, majoring in print/web journalism. When she's not writing for the Journal, you can find her exploring Beacon hill with her friends, rewatching her favorite shows, reading, listening to music or spending time with her family.

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‘The Play That Goes Wrong’ does everything right