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The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

The Head and the Heart effortlessly blend folk and rock in latest album

The Head and the Heart effortlessly blend  folk and rock in latest album
Courtesy of Alex Currie

Over the past decade, folk-rock band The Head and the Heart have been creating profound music while gaining countless fans along the way. The beloved group released their fourth studio album on May 17 titled “Living Mirage,” which beautifully blends meaningful lyrics and catchy rhythms.

The Head and the Heart are known for having a soft sound, but the band branches out on their latest album to experiment with a heavier use of drums and piano to create infectious rhythms.

For instance, the lively drums that carry the song “Missed Connection” – which was ranked No. 2 on the Billboard chart for adult alternative songs – are irresistible to tap your foot along to while singer Jonathan Russell’s voice remains smooth and light. The fusion of airy vocals and upbeat instrumentals create the perfect crossover between mellow folk songs and danceable rock
tracks.

Two of the band’s vocalists, Russell and Charity Rose Thielen, deserve extra recognition for their killer voices. Russell beautifully commands his voice perfectly though each song, hitting every misty high note and strongly belting out the rest. His wide vocal range is showcased both in his solos and alongside Thielen.

Russell and Thielen’s voices intertwine on a number of tracks throughout the album, like “Honeybee,” where they bounce back and forth between lead and back-up vocals. Neither one of the singers overpower the other as they masterfully mix their voices into one delicate unit.

Courtesy of Alex Currie

In addition to fantastic vocals, the rest of the band helps piece together each song by skillfully playing percussion and string instruments. Some songs strongly rely on the acoustic guitar, like the raw and expressive track “Glory Of Music,” but others have a rockier vibe as they use more electric guitar and keyboard.

Little touches in tempo and instrumentals are added in some parts that make certain songs sound different than the band’s typical style, but nevertheless, the album flows nicely. There is a balance between dulcet and zippy tracks.

Like their previous records, “Living Mirage” is a poetic album that expresses feelings about deep themes like love and heartbreak. The track “See You Through My Eyes,” for example, talks about how people are unable to have real relationships with others until they understand how to appreciate themselves first, as the line “Until you learn to love yourself, the door is locked to someone else” suggest.

Between the lyrics, vocals and instrumental work, it is safe to say that “Living Mirage” will please both die-hard fans and new ears. To hear The Head and the Heart perform their new music live, see them at their upcoming concert in Boston at the Agganis Arena on October 12.

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Morgan Hume
Morgan Hume, Arts Editor | she/her
Morgan is a native of Troy, New York and the Arts and Culture Editor for The Suffolk Journal. She is a rising majoring in print/web journalism and minoring in history. When she isn't scribbling into a notebook, she can be found drowning herself in cups of coffee, singing too loudly in the shower and exploring Boston, the historic city that has quickly become her home. Follow Morgan on Twitter @morganmhume
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The Head and the Heart effortlessly blend folk and rock in latest album