Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Your School. Your Paper. Since 1936.

The Suffolk Journal

Diversity won in recent elections

To change the current political climate of the US, women rose to the occasion

The possibility for women, minorities and LGBTQ-identifying people to be elected to United States offices during President Donald Trump’s era became a triumphant reality last week. Voters provided the Democratic party with its first round of major wins since the disheartening results of the 2016 presidential election.

The hope lost a year ago when the Trump administration was elected into office has slowly been restored, as the state and local elections represent women of diversity who align with the Democratic party.

Danica Roem has been elected as the first openly transgender legislator in U.S. history. Roem is a former journalist who has overcome the hardship of hate speech and has declared that she was “not really a woman” and “morally disturbed.” Nonetheless, Roem persisted, and nearly a year after her transition, she campaigned and devoted herself to become a lawmaker. Roem defeated Republican incumbent Bob Marshall who had introduced a “bathroom bill” that had looked to restrict which bathrooms Roem and other transgender people could use.

Roem’s success in becoming the nation’s first transgender member of Virginia’s House of Delegates is a victory for America, specifically the transgender community. Roem’s induction ignites a sense of hope that the nation is moving toward one that is equally representative of all people.

Andrea Jenkins has also made history as the first black transgender woman to be elected to public office in the U.S. She was elected to the Minneapolis City Council shortly after Roem. Roem’s and Jenkins’ success had indicated that the LGBTQ community will not tolerate bigotry or hatred, and will not stray away from pursuing and achieving their goals despite opposition and the existence of transphobia and homophobia in America.

Hala Ayala and Elizabeth Guzman joined Danica Roem in breaking political and historical barriers. Ayala and Guzman are both the first Latinas to be elected to the Virginia House of Delegates. These women represent diversity in American politics and their success plays a major role to show Hispanic women that they can accomplish anything. A voter approached Ayala and told her that he hoped she would inspire his young daughter to one day run for office, according to The New York Times.

Durkan is now Seattle’s first openly lesbian mayor and she is also Seattle’s first female mayor since the 1920s.

An outstanding woman to mention and a democratic victory was Jenny Durkan, who adds to the many diverse victories across the country. Durkan is now Seattle’s first openly lesbian mayor and she is also Seattle’s first female mayor since the 1920s.

These women and their victories are telling of what the future political climate of America may entail, one with an agenda which is without hatred, and one that both tries to represent and to accept all people.

This election year, the U.S. offices grew immensely more representative of people of diversity who come from different social communities and backgrounds.

These women are incredible role models for all Americans, especially for that of young girls and women.

They have proven that despite the current presidency and the existence of opposition in the nation, women are able to persist and succeed.

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Diversity won in recent elections