Boston Common lights Christmas Tree

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Vanessa Cabrera

The Boston Common Christmas Tree as seen from the Common Visitor’s Center.

The Boston Common Christmas tree was lit on Dec. 1, marking the official start of the holiday season for the city.

The tree, hailing from Nova Scotia, was decorated with over 7,000 colorful lights, ornaments and topped with a blue LED star. 

The lights were turned on just before 8 p.m. by Boston Mayor Michelle Wu, who was joined by holiday icons Santa Claus and Rudolph.

The event also included refreshments, gifts, music, entertainment and an impressive pyrotechnic show.

With an abundance of activities and holiday cheer, thousands of spectators showed up to the event.

Barbara Consales, a senior marketing major at Suffolk University, said the night was one to remember.

“I’m senior and I had never come to this event before. I am impressed by how many people showed up! The fireworks were so fun! I was not expecting them and I had a really good time,” Consales said.

Many said the event was fantastic — not only because it was full of surprises but also because the warmth of the people was palpable.

Ryan Chamberlain, a freshman marketing major, said, “[The event] is really cool. I think it’s nice to see everyone in Boston coming out. So many people here. I think it’s really cool how they do the fireworks at the end as well.”

Local Bostonians and tourists alike crowded around for the annual splendor. Joaquin Heller Della-Vecchia, a junior marketing major, said both Bostonians and people from all over the world were gathered at the event.

“It’s super nice to see the people from Boston and all different parts of the world coming together and celebrating a nice holiday,” said Della-Vecchia.

Every year, the citizens of Nova Scotia send a tree to symbolize their gratitude to Boston for sending a trainload of supplies and emergency personnel to aid in the Halifax explosion on Dec. 6, 1917. Boston was the first international aid to arrive on the scene and the last to leave.