Pussy Riot makes a statement in Sochi

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Amid the chaos and pun-ridden buffoonery that has plagued the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, another footnote has been added to that legacy. The politically charged and just as equally rambunctious Pussy Riot just narrowly avoided arrest after being detained in Sochi after an alleged theft from the Hotel Adler.

Clearly, this was a blatant coup to absorb members of the group back into the system. For those still unfamiliar with the punk rock activists, Pussy Riot came to prominence in late 2011 as a de-facto call to arms against Vladimir Putin and his regime.

The collectives’ popularity continued to soar virally after their public performances   anywhere from Subway carts to Detention centers. The group does not have any official releases, but you can surely find their completed recordings under the “Kill The Sexist.”

(Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Members of the group, including Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, were arrested in 2012 on minor charges. Further, the group was arrested and later went on a hunger strike in prison. In January of last year, a documentary entitled Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer was released and bought by HBO.

After a lengthy and highly supported battle, the members were released to much praise, in what the members believed was just a ploy because of the upcoming Olympics.

Since their release, Tolokonnikova and Alyokhina have been ex-communicated essentially from the nude, neo group.

While it is hard to craft an un-biased opinion for the unlawful detaining of a group only supporting basic human rights against a corrupt system, I do have emotions that flee from this situation. One is palpable fear and whimsical curiosity. Two polar opposites I gather, but very much thought out.

I understand that I should celebrate the popularity of Pussy Riot and the feats that the collective have and will achieve, but the way we worship celebrity status and saturate it in our society makes me ponder how Pussy Riot will survive in the saturation of the media. Yes the group is against the cult of personality of any kind but hey, the original leader of the occupy movement now works for Google.

The group still has much work to do in its native homeland, but can they survive such scrutiny? Does it have the means to hold its own against such a prevalent system? I truly hope that the group is still able to avoid the conversion to full-blown mainstream hierarchy, and I wonder, what will the group do to top themselves next?

I have a strong feeling that this is only the beginning and that we have yet to see the feats that they are capable of. I just hope that the media outlets are pointing out that these innocent women were arrested on false charges and not simply that Pussy Riot members were arrested.  It is my last wish to see them become Pussy Riot LLC.

Then again I am a man and according to the group, “we are all — female separatist collective — no man can represent us either on a poster or in reality.”

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